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Since this is a brand new blog, I thought I would share information about bloggers I love.  I come from a background where I feel expected to talk about the heavy-headed dead white European male philosophers who influence me, and there will be plenty of time to talk about them.

Right now, I am beginning a blog, and I’m driven to write in this format because of the influence of several wonderful bloggers.  Hence, this is a list of people writing write now, on the Internet, whose work inspires me.  That might me that they make me laugh, or that I’ve taken their advice and done well with it, or that they are just nifty people.  Some are famous, some are not.  This list is not inclusive, in no particular order, and I might update this post as I go.

Black Belt in Life by Audrey Lallier: Audrey is a co-worker who is in the process of earning her black belt in Tae Kwan Do.  In addition to being a real life ninja, she’s one of the funniest, most caring friends a person could have.  Her blog may not be the most widely-read one on this list, but it’s worth a follow.

Inside Higher Ed by Eric Stoller: I first became acquainted with Eric by reading his blogs and following his tweets.  He offers a lot of great practical advice (at least one post on how taking his advice has helped me and my department is forthcoming).  I was fortunate enough to meet him in the real world at NASPA’s Technology Conference in October 2012.  He’s a witty person from whom I am glad I have had opportunities to learn.

Pandagon by Amanda Marcotte: Three words: Snarky. Feminist. Heaven.  Amanda frequently prints and holds herself professionally accountable for saying things I think, but would be uncomfortable saying.  Her writing makes me feel slightly better about some of the more depressing things I see in the news.

The Art of Transformation by Dr. Bertice Berry: I met Dr. Berry when she gave a particularly inspiring keynote speech at SWACUHO (the Southwest Association of College and University Housing Officers).  Dr. Berry blogs every single day, so I don’t have time to read everything she writes, but I admire her ability to write prolifically and positively.

The Bloggess by Jenny Lawson: This woman is a bit of a hero to me.  How many other women from middle of nowhere Texas are able to get Wil Wheaton to send her photos of himself collating paper?  Despite her health concerns (which she covers candidly in her blog), she is able to find joy in the most unexpected places (giant metal chickens, anyone?).  I “met” her at a book signing earlier this year, by which I mean she took a photo with my friend Carly and me as she was signing our copies of her book.  I’m still a little starstruck.

Carly, Bloggess, Me

One of these people has been No. 1 on the New York Times Bestseller List. Hint, it’s not the one on the right.

Topper Livin’ by Baillee Perkins and Casey Casion: I “supervise” Baillee and Casey as they write a blog about the RA Experience at St. Edward’s University.  When I say supervise, I mean that I hit “publish” on their drafts and give them kudos.  They are great young writers and I’m inspired by their efforts.

ACRE Texas Blog by Susan Garry: This is my mom’s blog.  She writes about the goings-on in the rural community where my parents live.  Her influence on me is more profound outside of her blog, which gets updated most frequently when someone is trying to put new rail lines or a freeway through the back pasture.  This happens more often than you would think.

What blogs make you feel happy, inspired or put you in a good mood?

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One thought on “What I Read

  1. Pingback: The Evolution of Topper Livin’ | Needs More Queso

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